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National Biomedical Center
for Advanced Electron Spin Resonance Technology

Our research is supported by a grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), part of the National Institutes of Health.

ACERT News

last update:   May 25, 2017


New Signal Denoising Method Developed at ACERT

Madhur Srivastava, a graduate research assistant at ACERT, has developed a powerful new method to reduce noise in experimental signals of the types used in biomedical imaging research. The method can greatly improve image resolution and has the potential to significantly shorten the time needed to obtain images, with the eventual goal of allowing applications that are not feasible today, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in emergency-room situations. While standard denoising methods can reduce random noise, not correlated with any signal, they do poorly with correlated noise that indicates the presence of data peaks. By splitting experimental signals into wavelets, different frequency components, his algorithm can find those peaks and then remove the correlated noise as well. To date, the new technique has been able to reduce data acquisition times by an order of magnitude or more. Two papers have been published with Madhur as lead author. The first paper, a general description of the algorithm, was published in July, 2016, in IEEE Access (available here); and the second, describing the algorithm's application to PDS ESR, was web-published in early March, 2017, in J. Phys. Chem. A (available here). In addition, a provisional patent (U.S. No. 62/334,626; filed May 11, 2016) has been obtained. Several other publications are in preparation.


Funding Awarded for ENDOR Spectrometer

In July, 2016, Cornell was awarded $1.4M by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to purchase a Pulsed EPR/ENDOR Spectrometer System from the Bruker Biospin Corp. This instrument will allow us to establish the only center for Pulsed Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) in the Northeast U.S. Multiple research groups at Cornell and elsewhere in NY will be principal users of the instrument. Professor Emeritus Jack H. Freed is the PI of this NIH grant, and the spectrometer will be located in ACERT and be maintained by ACERT personnel.


ACERT Graduate Student Selected for Engineering College Commercialization Fellows Group

In May, 2016, ACERT graduate research assistant Madhur Srivastava was one of six Ph.D. students selected to be the first group of Commercialization Fellows, a program in Cornell University's College of Engineering, created to give students opportunities to learn how to take their newly-developed technologies and turn them into potential businesses. Madhur has been researching a new method for denoising signals in ESR and other type of magnetic resonance techniques. The article appears in the Cornell Chronicle.


ACERT 2015 Workshop and Symposium

We are pleased to report that the latest ACERT Workshop, "Computational Methods in ESR", was once again well-attended and successful. This year, we brought together scientists and students for discussion of available software and simulation techniques related to ESR/EPR magnetic resonance.

ACERT featured in Biophysical TV video

Jack Freed receives 2014 ACS Joel Henry Hildebrand Award in the Theoretical and Experimental Chemistry of Liquids:

American Chemical Society announced that Jack H. Freed is the 2014 recipient of the Joel Henry Hildebrand Award in the Theoretical and Experimental Chemistry of Liquids sponsored by ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co.  The national award recognizes distinguished contributions to the understanding of the chemistry and physics of liquids.  Professor Freed was presented the award at the Society’s 247th ACS National Meeting in Dallas, TX on Tuesday, March 18, 2014.   He was invited to deliver an award talk. The talk was entitled “ESR Perspective on Complex Liquids (A Retrospective)”

An article reporting about Dr. Freed’s work and the award appeared the February 10 issue of Chemical & Engineering News (Vol. 92, Issue 6, p.31):  http://cen.acs.org/articles/92/i6/Joel-Henry-Hildebrand-Award-Theoretical.html

Presentation

Jack Freed awarded 2013 ISMAR Prize:

The ISMAR Prize is awarded every three years for outstanding achievement in the field of magnetic resonance.

Jack Freed’s work is honored: "For the foundation of modern EPR through an extraordinary range of contributions from mathematics and theory to methodology and instrumentation; and for the application of his ingenious methods of pulsed EPR spectroscopy to fundamental problems in areas from chemistry to biophysics."

Presentation

Interviews:

"A Conversation with Jack H Freed" (Interview with Brian Crane)

News articles:

"Study Reveals New Insights into the Function of Transporters in the Brain Implicated in Stroke and Neurodegenerative Disease" Weill Cornell Newsroom, February 4, 2015.

"Chemists show that ALS is a protein aggregation disease" by Anne Ju, Cornell Chronicle, October 20, 2010.

"A new spin on ESR" by Michael Gross, Chemistry and Industry, August 2010.

"Spinning Around" by Michael Gross, Chemistry World, May 2010, pp. 50-53.

 

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